BJP’s worry about the AAP

The Aam Aadmi Party’s spectacular electoral debut coupled with the huge setback for the Congress and Rahul Gandhi is good – as well as bad – news for Narendra Modi.

A clear front-runner for more than a year, constantly increasing his lead over Gandhi, the verdict of assembly elections is the first real political worry for Modi. But, before the bad news let’s look at the positives.

The good tidings stem from two counts: virtual decimation of the Congress and the limited time available for either the AAP – on its own – or any other national alternative to coalesce. The main challenge to Modi at the moment comes from an assortment of regional parties. Unless they succeed in projecting themselves as a credible
pan-Indian alternative, those rooting for Modi because they look at him as a strong personality and a doer are unlikely to look for alternatives.

The worries that the recent verdict has generated for Modi stem from the possibility that the AAP effect may now spill beyond Delhi, and constituencies where it can draw blood have so far been in the BJP’s comfort zone. AAP’s
current social base is primarily urban, though not only the urbane. Immediate acceptability of its political idiom is likely to be restricted to urban constituencies. Here, lower middle and working classes feel most strongly about the twin issues that form the cornerstones of the AAP campaign: corruption and price rise. Here, lower middle and working classes feel most strongly about the twin issues that form the cornerstones of the AAP campaign: corruption and price rise.

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/27669861.cms?intenttarget=no&utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

Election Commission warning parties, again

Surely, we do not need monitoring always by the Election Commission. When will our parties learn to be wiser and mature ?

Declining to act on petitions by the  Congress and BJP seeking each other’s de-recognition for repeated violations of the model code of conduct and use of intemperate language by party leaders, the Election Commission on Thursday put all parties on notice and warned of action in case they still failed to restrain themselves.

Read more at

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/EC-tells-parties-to-restrain-themselves-warns-of-action/articleshow/26545740.cms

Parties taking part in the Delhi elections

To analyse the parties taking part in the Delhi elections, we need to examine their manifestos and understand their vision in a better way.

As Delhi hurtles toward its most unpredictable election in recent years, one thing has become clear: the contest will be a genuinely three-cornered one.

The incumbent Congress party is seeking a fourth straight term in power, the main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party is hoping to ride an anti-incumbency wave, and the upstart Aam Aadmi Party has startled the two behemoths with its rapid rise.

On Tuesday, a week before the Dec. 4 polls, the BJP released its manifesto, a blueprint for changes it will bring in the next five years if it is voted to power. Its rival parties circulated their list of promises in earlier weeks. In these documents, the three parties each promise vast overhauls in Delhi as they attempt to surpass their opponents’ pledges.

Read more at http://blogs.wsj.com/indiarealtime/2013/11/27/delhi-party-manifestos-dissected/